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Monday, October 21, 2013

I DON’T WANT TO BRAG, BUT MY KIDS ARE 50, 52 & 54--& THEY’RE ALL TOILET TRAINED!!



Not funny today--just some absolutely amazing young people:

Kim Ung-Yong

His world-record IQ of 210 makes him a genius nearly twice over. By age 3 (that’s not a typo) he was a physics student at university. NASA brought him from Korea to do research for them at age 8. He worked there for 10 years while earning a PhD in physics at the age of 16. When he left NASA and returned home, amazingly he could not find a job because he needed elementary, middle, and high school diplomas, all of which he had skipped and had to go back and earn.



Sho Yano
A 1500 SAT score is great, but every year dozens of students score higher. Only, Sho Yano earned his score when he was 8 years old. By that time he’d been reading for six years and composing music for four. At 9 he enrolled at Loyola University, and would graduate summa cum laude four years later and enter med school. Five years after that, when other kids might have celebrated an 18th birthday by buying cigarettes or emancipating themselves from their parents, Sho was reveling in his hard-earned PhD in molecular genetics and cell biology from the University of Chicago.

Christopher Hirata
Kim Ung-Yong may be in Guinness as the world’s smartest man, but that may need to be updated. Christopher Hirata’s IQ is a mind-boggling, “verified” 225. His life is a stream of similarly amazing facts. He skipped seventh through tenth grades. He would fill in for his physics teacher in high school while himself not even yet a teenager. At 13, he did so well at the International Physics Olympiad that a “Youngest Medalist” award was created and then given to him. His PhD came at the age of 22 from Princeton in the field of astrophysics. Smart kid.

Michael Kearney

The only partying Michael Kearney did in college involved birthday cakes and fruit punch. In 1995 he became the youngest college grad ever at the age of 10, with a bachelor’s in anthropology. A master’s degree in biochemistry from Middle Tennessee State University followed four years later, and by 2006 he was set to receive his doctorate at 22. Kearney had been more an infant prodigy than a child prodigy, telling his doctor “I have a left ear infection” at the age of six months.

All items above from onlinecolleges.net

Ruth Lawrence (1971) passed the Oxford University interview entrance examination in mathematics, coming first out of all 530 candidates sitting the examination at the age of 10. At the age of 13 she became the youngest to graduate from the University of Oxford in modern times.

John von Neumann (1903–1957) a "mental calculator" by six years old, who could tell jokes in classical Greek.

Tanishq Mathew Abraham (born 2003) is an American child prodigy with Indian (East) ancestry who joined the on-campus college Astronomy class at 7 years old. Not only did he pass the course with an A grade but he was the top student among his college classmates (the youngest in the world). He is also one of the youngest members of American Mensa, joining at 4 years old in 2008. As of 2010, he and his younger sister, Tiara Thankam Abraham are the youngest siblings to both join Mensa at 4 years old.

Akrit Jaswal (born April 23, 1993) is an Indian adolescent who is a child prodigy as a physician. He performed his first surgery at the age of seven. He is the youngest person (at age 12) to get admitted in a medical university in India.

Ricky Schroder won a Golden Globe Award at nine years old, youngest winner ever.

H. P. Lovecraft recited poetry at two years old and wrote long poems at five years old.

Pablo Picasso painted Picador at eight years old.

Wang Yani had her paintings appear on postage stamps at six years old and in worldwide museum exhibits at 12 years old.

John Stuart Mill knew several dead languages by eight years old and studied scholastic philosophy at 12 years old.

Michelle Wie qualified for the USGA Women's Amateur Public Links at 10 years old and won the same event at 13 years old, making her the youngest person both to qualify for and win a USGA adult national championship.

Wayne Gretzky was skating with 10-year-olds at six years old. By 10 years old, he scored 378 goals and 139 assists, in just 85 games, with the Nadrofsky Steelers.

Tiger Woods was a child prodigy, introduced to golf before the age of two, by his athletic father Earl. In 1984 at the age of eight, he won the 9–10 boys' event, the youngest age group available, at the Junior World Golf Championships. He first broke 80 at age eight. He went on to win the Junior World Championships six times, including four consecutive wins from 1988 to 1991.

Willie Mosconi, nicknamed "Mr. Pocket Billiards", played against professionals at six years old.
2nd section from wikipedia

Here's 13 minutes of beautiful music:


Well,  maybe a little funny:









All my adult life I've wanted to be a child prodigy----fishducky

   



23 comments:

  1. Oh dear. Did you mean to make me feel inadequate? You succeeded.
    Though I noted that while Tiger Woods may have been a golfing prodigy, he failed in relationships, ethics and basic honesty. I hope the other progdigies also have a flaw or two.

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    1. Sorry--& about Tiger Woods, YOU'RE RIGHT!!

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  2. I need to see a post about underachievers. Then I might have a chance.
    It was nice to see the token Americans amongst the group.

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    1. A short story for you:

      THE LITTLE ENGINE THAT COULDN’T

      A little railroad engine was employed at a station yard for some light work moving a few cars on and off the switches. One morning it was waiting for the next call when a long train of freight cars asked a large engine in the roundhouse to take it over the hill. The first engine that it asked said, "Sorry, there are too many cars for me!" Then the train asked another engine, and another, only to hear excuses like “Union rules won’t let me, it’s too heavy,” “Today’s my day off,” and one even said, “I would, but I threw my back out “.
      In desperation, the freight train asked the little engine if it could pull it up the grade and down on the other side. "I think I can," puffed the little locomotive, and put itself in front of the great heavy train. As it went on the little engine kept bravely puffing faster and faster and said to itself, "I think I can, I think I can, I think I can."

      As it neared the top of the grade, which had so discouraged the larger engines, it went more slowly. However, it still kept climbing and saying, "I think I can, I think I can." It reached the top by using all its muscles and being very brave. It then went on down the grade, feeling very pleased until it started sliding down. No matter how hard the engineers pressed on their brakes, neither train could stop. There was a tremendous crash! They soon lay in a mangled heap at the bottom of the hill.
      The other trains rushed over and asked him what on earth had happened. He said, "I thought I could, I thought I could, but I just couldn’t. I gave it a really good try, though!”

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  3. I have always believed I am really, really good at something that has just not been invented yet.

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    1. I'm sure you are--I wonder what it could be?

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  4. When our son was a baby my wife kept saying she hoped he was smart. I remember thinking I didn't want him to be too smart because an overwhelming number of child prodigies end up miserable or even suicidal. As it turned out I needn't have worried.

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    1. I'm so glad worrying wasn't necessary--I think!!

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  5. Dear Fishducky, I always wanted to be brilliant. I thought that I was unlovable just the way I was but if I were to be brilliant than everyone would admire and love me! Peace.

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    1. A song for you:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jH68Xci34nE

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  6. Damn. I wish I could tell jokes in classical Greek. I'm such an idiot.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. That's all right--no one would understand you, anyway!!

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    2. I read an article that said Ronan Farrow, who I think is 25, is going to have his own show on MSNBC next year (son of Mia Farrow and maybe Woody Allen). He graduated from college at 15 and then went to Yale Law. I don't care how smart he is. I've seen his picture and I'm going to watch his show just to LOOK at him. He is so hot. Woody Allen can't possibly be his father. Mia says Frank Sinatra might have been.

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    3. I just saw his picture--Woody Allen, NO WAY!!

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  7. Well? being potty trained is a good thing ... we are then we get old ... I hope I stay potty trained... at least that's something....

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  8. My kids are all toilet trained too, they're 32, 36, 38 and 40.
    I'm impressed by the long list of geniuses there, with their achievements.
    My own shining moment was learning to read at age three, (not so impressive when I read about that lot up there), and it's been all downhill from then on.

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    1. I assume that you, like Kim Ung-Yong, you were also a physics student at university at that age!!.

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  9. I'd never read that about the smart guys.
    How did you potty train your kids so quickly. I still wear depends and I'm 62 :)

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    1. Jilda must be VERY lenient--my kid's spouses insisted on it!!

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  10. See... my plan is to just raise my kids to be a little less dysfunctional than me. there's a lot of pressure in being an actual genius, and no one needs that.

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    1. How's the "little less dysfunctional" part going?

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Your comments make my day, which shows you how boring my life has become.