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Friday, August 15, 2014

*TI AMO, IL SIG. ANONIMO!!


* I love you, Mr. Nameless!! 




(This post is dedicated to my son-in-law, Nameless' husband.  He will be referred to as S. A., Signore Anomino--Mr. Nameless.)



Take a good look at the cartoon above.  It shows my son-in-law one day a few years ago when he was pleading with his daughters to tell him where they had hidden his glasses.  He told them he couldn't find them & he had looked everywhere!  When they were finally able to stop laughing, they told them they were in his hand.

A while ago he & Nameless went to a restaurant for dinner.  They were about to get into their car when S. A. told her that he had to go back into the restaurant because he had forgotten his glasses.  She found that odd & told him that he was wearing them.

(This paragraph is from a recent post)
Last year we took our family to dinner at Lawry's prime rib restaurant  to celebrate my daughter & son-in-law's wedding anniversary & my granddaughter's 22nd birthday. There were 9 of us at a round table.  I was seated first & S. A. (the birthday girl's father) chose to sit on my left.  We were all talking & laughing & near the end of the dinner we were chatting with our waitress.  She told us that she had thought that my son-in-law & I were a couple because we obviously enjoyed each other's company so much. She thought I was a COUGAR!!  I loved it!!

S. A. was raised in Italy & came here to marry my daughter.  They met while they were both in school in Switzerland.  He spoke Italian (of course) & French when he came here, but not English.  One of the very first phrases in English that he learned was, "It's not my fault; it's Nameless' fault!"  They have now been married for more than 25 years, so he obviously has had many occasions to use it.

Soon after S .A. arrived in California, he took an ESL (English as a Second Language) course & had gotten a job as a stock boy.  He came over one day & said, “Mom, this guy at work keeps asking me questions around lunchtime & I don’t know what he’s saying.  I looked up the words & couldn’t find them in the dictionary.”  I asked him what the words were.  He told me “jeet” & “wajeet”.  If he hadn’t mentioned that it was around lunchtime, I’m not sure I could’ve helped him.  I told him his coworker was asking, “Did you eat?” & “What did you eat?”. 


I assume this is how he learned Italian:















I knew you’d like this post.  The voices told me so----fishducky

 












32 comments:

  1. Signore Anomino came to live with the right family. Not only that, if you love him, we love him.
    And the video cracked me up. My partner's sister married a man with some Italian heritage. When their children were small any noise (particularly at meal times) was attributed by their grandparents to 'the Italian in them...'
    Your voices were very right today. Thank you. And them.

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  2. I love how the waitress thought you and your son-in-law were a couple, and how you were able to translate "jeet" and "wajeet!" What a great story! The cute video was an added bonus!

    Julie

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  3. Chuckled along until I got to the last photo.....pizza being delivered to the pearly gates....wouldn't it be wonderful?

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  4. I'd hate to admit to the places I've left my glasses over the years. Thanks for the laughs.

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  5. The voices were right! LOLOL!!! :)

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    1. As I said to Elephant's Child, I NEVER question my voices!!

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  6. Dear Fishducky, I had to chuckle several times while reading this posting. You've started my day on the right track again! I don't know why I so enjoyed this posting about your son-in-law Nameless and glasses but I did. And the video of the grandmother and the little girl was just a delight. I think Italians do use body language--especially arms and hands and shoulders--a lot. Or at least that is the vision I have of them. I like the exuberance of that little girl. Peace.

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    1. Do you know what they call an Italian with 2 broken arms? Speech impaired!!

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    2. Dear Fran, I love it!!! Peace.

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  7. Replies
    1. Are you asking me to be your cougar?

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  8. Hey, he sounds perfectly normal to me. I once refused to believe my glasses were actually mine. I couldn't believe I had such poor taste in eye wear.

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    1. Didn't you have to have your glasses on to see what they looked like?

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  9. Can you imagine Italian ice cream with parmesan.....

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    1. Gelato is good, parmesan is good--why not?

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  10. The voices didn't lie. I LOVED this post. It sounds like you and your son-in-law have a terrific relationship, you cougar you. Not that I'm surprised. With your sense of humor, I imagine you must get along well with everyone.

    Happy weekend!

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    1. Everyone except boring people & bitches!! (My voices never lie--they may kid me a little bit, but they NEVER lie.)

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  11. I feel his pain. I often need my glasses to find my glasses. haha
    He is a lucky man to have you as a mother in law.

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    1. Thanks--at least he believes he is!!

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  12. The story about the glasses sounds exactly like what my siblings are I do with our Dad!

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    1. Isn't that what kids are supposed to do to dads?

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  13. I don't know how I missed this post. It's adorable.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. Thank you--check for my posts Mondays & Fridays!!

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  14. As always - loads of laughter :) Thank you! And hey maybe I can somehow illegally squeeze into your family too? Sounds like you're all having great fun!

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    1. You're VERY welcome!! I'll think about creating a family membership application.

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  15. I love this whole post and that video has become one of my all time favourites!
    I once "lost" my glasses and when I thought I'd found them, tried to put them on only to discover they were my daughter's and mine were already on my face.
    I used to work in factories with many Italians and watching them speak with each other at lunchtimes became the highlight of my days.

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  16. PS, my son-in-law is Italian and my grand daughter is now dating the Italian boy who works for him. I foresee many happy years ahead.

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  17. Sono contento che ti è piaciuto il post--ogni parola ho scritto il mio genero era vera. Auguro al vostro nipote molti anni di felicità!! (I assume your son-in-law can translate this for you.)

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Your comments make my day, which shows you how boring my life has become.