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Friday, July 1, 2016

WE INTERRUPT THIS REGULARLY SCHEDULED BLOG FOR BREAKING NEWS!! FISHDUCKY COOKED!!





(Some of this was in A FESTIVAL Of FAVORITES FROM FISHDUCKY'S FEEDERY 8/11/15, but the cartoons are all new.)

Yes, it's true--I cooked!!  I remember it like it was yesterday.  Of course, that could have been because it was yesterday.  I have to admit that after 61 years of marriage the thrill of cooking is gone.  I used to grow my own food but I can't find bacon seeds any more.  I saw a sticker on a loaf of bread that said, “baked fresh for over 50 years”--who wants to put that much time into cooking?  Now, when I do cook, I make a roasting pan full of chili or whatever.  I then freeze it in individual servings.  We've accumulated many empty one pound containers of "I Can't Believe It's Not Axle Grease" over the years.  I've found these to be cheap & just the right size.  What did I make?  I'm glad you asked.  I made this & I doubled the recipe.  It filled 16 containers. We have a freezer downstairs:

BRISKET:

This tastes like barbecued beef.  I usually serve it with mashed potatoes.  I had a friend who's now passed away (not from eating the brisket) who had a very large Catholic family.  When they came over for lunch she would set up a buffet & they would make "barbecued beef" sandwiches on french rolls, along with cole slaw & potato salad.

4-5# beef brisket (not corned beef)
3 onions, chopped
3/4 c. red wine
1½ c. catsup
3 shakes Worcester sauce 

It is not necessary to brown the brisket.  Mix together all ingredients except brisket & put in covered roasting pan.  Put brisket on the mixture & put several spoonsful on top of the meat.  Cover & cook in 325° oven until very tender; about 3-4 hours, occasionally spooning sauce over the meat.  This is best if cooked the day before & refrigerated with the meat & sauce separated for 24 hours.  It’s easier to slice cold & you can remove any fat from on top of the sauce or the meat.  Slice brisket very thin diagonally & reheat in the sauce.  It is not necessary to brown the brisket.  Mix together all ingredients except brisket & put in covered roasting pan.  Put brisket on the mixture & put several spoonsful on top of the meat.  Cover & cook in 325° oven until very tender; about 3-4 hours, occasionally spooning sauce over the meat.  This is best if cooked the day before & refrigerated with the meat & sauce separated for 24 hours.  It’s easier to slice cold & you can remove any fat from on top of the sauce or the meat.  Slice brisket very thin diagonally & reheat in the sauce.

Here's another recipe I love.  I don't know how well it freezes because we've never had enough left over to freeze.  Seeing this made me want it, so after I finished writing this post I made some for dinner:  

SCALLOPED POTATOES WITH CHEESE:

Potatoes & cheese—what’s not to like?  Serves 2 fishduckies or 6 to 8 normal people.

3-4 large potatoes
1 can cream of mushroom soup
2 c. sharp cheddar cheese, grated
Salt & pepper to taste

Grease (I use spray) the bottom & sides of a low flat baking dish.  Peel the potatoes & slice them thin; about 1/8 to 1/4 inch.  Put them in a bowl, add the remaining ingredients & mix thoroughly.  Put them in the casserole dish, keeping the mix not over 2 inches high.  Bake uncovered in 350° oven until potatoes are soft, about 60-75 minutes.

Next time you're stuck with have the privilege of cooking the holiday dinner, I suggest you try this stuffing/dressing, made outside the bird.  This recipe comes from Bud’s family. They've been making it for about 100 years—it should be ready any minute now!!:

TURKEY (OR CHICKEN) DRESSING:

2--1 1/2# loaves of bread (we have used white, french or sourdough--all good)
4 medium onions
2 bunches parsley
2 cups nuts (walnuts or pecans)
1/2# butter, melted
Salt & pepper
1 cup turkey broth (Bud usually boils the neck with onions, celery, salt & pepper to make soup, which I use as the liquid for gravy.  I assume you could use canned chicken broth, but we've never tried it.)

Put bread in food processor (metal chopping blade) a handful at a time & pulse until you have fluffy crumbs.  Before processors, we used to grate it through a vegetable colander; processors are much easier & they stop blood from scraped fingers from getting in the dressing.  Remove to a large bowl--we use the bottom of a roasting pan.  Chop onions & parsley together in the processor until fine & add to bread.  Chop nuts (NOT in processor--they become dust) & add, along with melted butter, salt & pepper (to taste) & mix to moisten evenly.  It's good raw & should taste slightly salty.  If you prepare it the day before, wait to put in the butter.  When you're ready to cook it, put it in a large greased casserole dish, add 1/3 of the broth (just pour it evenly across the top & do not stir), cover & place in 350° oven.  After 15 minutes add another 1/3 of the broth. Add the last 1/3 after another 15 minutes & cook 15 minutes longer.  Total cooking time is 45 minutes.  If you don’t like it, mail it to me—I love it!!

Most people in my family love my cooking.  It's just that I don't do much of it any more.  One notable exception was our dog, Pepe.  I've told you this story before:

We had a dog, Pepe, who would eat anything.  He used to nose around when I was sweeping the kitchen floor to see what delicacies he might glean in the dust.  One day I served meatloaf for dinner, as I had done many times before.  Bud said it tasted funny & he wouldn’t eat it.  The kids agreed.  I said it was just fine.  Bud said not even the dog would eat it.  I said, “Oh, yeah?”, took his plate & put it on the floor.  Pepe came over, sniffed the meatloaf & walked away.  I never trusted that dog again. 





I sent the kids & Bud this ecard:



This may or may not fit in here:
Bride:  The two things I cook best are meat loaf and apple pie. 
Groom: Which is this?

What do you call cheese that belongs to somebody else?
Nacho cheese.

What do you call a fake noodle?
Impasta.


















What if soy milk is just regular milk introducing itself in Spanish?----Huffington Post (& fishducky)