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Tuesday, November 21, 2017

I THINK I LEFT MY MIND IN THE BASEMENT, LET ME GO UPSTAIRS & CHECK




Maurits Cornelis Escher (1898-1972) is one of the world's most famous graphic artists. His art is enjoyed by millions of people all over the world, as can be seen on the many web sites on the internet.

He is most famous for his so-called impossible constructions, such as
 Ascending and Descending:

and Relativity:


He became fascinated by the regular Division of the Plane, when he first visited the Alhambra, a fourteen century Moorish castle in Granada, Spain in 1922.

During the years in Switzerland and throughout the Second World War, he vigorously pursued his hobby, by drawing 62 of the total of 137 Regular Division Drawings he would make in his lifetime.

He would extend his passion for the Regular Division of the Plane, by using some of his drawings as the basis for yet another hobby, carving beech wood spheres.

Here are some examples of his Division of the Plane:

Sky and Water:

and Reptiles:

But he also made some wonderful, more realistic work during the time he lived and traveled in Italy. Castrovalva for example, where one already can see Escher's fascination for high and low, close by and far away.

Castrovalva:

 The lithograph Atrani, a small town on the Amalfi Coast was made in 1931, but comes back  in some of his future masterpieces, like Ascending and Descending.

Atari:

M.C. Escher made 448 lithographs, woodcuts and wood engravings and over 2000 drawings and sketches during his lifetime. Like some of his famous predecessors, (Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Dürer and Holbein), M.C. Escher was left-handed.


Apart from being a graphic artist, M.C. Escher illustrated books, designed tapestries, postage stamps and murals. He was born in Leeuwarden, the Netherlands, as the fourth and youngest son of a civil engineer. After 5 years the family moved to Arnhem where Escher spent most of his youth. After failing his high school exams, Maurits ultimately was enrolled in the School for Architecture and Decorative Arts in Haarlem.

After only one week, he informed his father that he would rather study graphic art instead of architecture, as he had shown his drawings and linoleum cuts to his graphic teacher Samuel Jessurun de Mesquita, who encouraged him to continue with graphic arts.

After finishing school, he traveled extensively through Italy, where he met his wife Jetta Umiker, whom he married in 1924. They settled in Rome, where they stayed until 1935. During these 11 years, Escher would travel each year throughout Italy, drawing and sketching for the various prints he would make when he returned home.

Many of these sketches he would later use for various other lithographs and/or woodcuts and wood engravings, for example the background in the lithograph Waterfall stems from his Italian period.

Waterfall:

He played with architecture, perspective and impossible spaces. His art continues to amaze millions of people all over the world. In his work we recognize his keen observation of the world around us and the expressions of his own fantasies. M.C. Escher shows us that reality is wondrous, comprehensible and fascinating.
http://www.mcescher.com/about/biography
















 


19 comments:

  1. Wow, Escher's mind threw everything out of perspective, his artwork is really fascinating.

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    1. Makes you wonder what he was like in person!!

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  2. I would not have gotten any of these cartoons without your biography.

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    1. They are sort of off the wall (or the stairs)!!

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  3. I adore Escher's work. My father introduced me to it when I was very young. I gave the smaller portion two Escher t-shirts and he wore them to death (and a bit beyond). Thanks Fran.

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    1. He's always been a favorite of mine!!

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    2. There are t-shirts available???

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  4. Escher is endlessly fascinating.

    Love,
    Janie

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  5. Wow. That man had a different brain that the rest of us. Would've loved to have had a conversation with him.

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    1. Do you think he was capable of normal conversation?

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  6. His artworks have always been fascinating. Truly a great imagination and maybe skewed vision--LOL! ;)

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  7. I've been a fan of M.C. Escher since high school.

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  8. I have one of those stairways to everywhere every which way pictures laminated as a bookmark. I'm amazed at the cleverness of all his works and the cartoons too.

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    1. I think it would distract me from reading the book!!

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  9. I get lost in them! But I can't look away. Good thing I kept the mouse wheel scrolling!

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Your comments make my day, which shows you how boring my life has become.